Softnecks:

Averages 6-8 large cloves per bulb.A vigorous grower resulting in good-sized bulbs. Do not plant too early or too much top growth can be damaged in winter. Mid-season harvest. It grows well in cold winter areas, but does poorly in warm winter areas. It has thin bulb wrappers that have a lot of purple and brown in them.  Great taste is their claim to fame, not long storage. Expect 4-5 months.

Korean Red - Not available for 2016

Photo Credit: Rasacreekfarm.com

Deep Purple -

Averages 6-8 cloves with gorgeous purple hues and rounded tips. Watch the bulbing progress by digging down on one side of the stem to inspect, and look for browning of the lower leaves. This will be the first garlic out of the ground and onto your table. Deep Purple harvests as early as the 3rd or 4th week in June. Be sure to err on the side of planting Deep Purple LATER in the fall than other garlics since it is a VERY early garlic and will set roots and begin breaking the soil surface before winter sets in if you plant to soon. Figure two weeks or so after you would normally plant. It may seem that Deep Purple doesn't store well, but it's actually a good keeper. 5 months or longer under good conditions. This variety comes to us from my best friends parents, The Bonnemaison's, who got it from a Chinese fellow in the early 1970's, but only a few bulbs were passed on to them. They then grew it in the hills of the South Okanagan for over 30 years.

Averages 4-5 large cloves per bulb. Strong growing in a wide range of climates and conditions, making it a good choice for gardeners and farmers. Northern Quebec has a greater tolerance for wet and dry than most Porcelains. Mid-season harvest. The wrappers are pretty sturdy on Porcelains and so the bulbs can stand waiting a bit longer before harvesting, maybe when 50 - 65% of the leaves are browning. As with other Porcelains, Northern Quebec is a good storing garlic. Expect 8-9 months, in proper dry conditions (use a dehumidifier if necessary). Came to us via Rasa Creek Farm, who received it from Boundary Garlic.

Northern Quebec -

Photo Credit: Rasacreekfarm.com

Photo Credit: Norwegiancreekfarm.ca

Averages 8-12 cloves and, like any Rocambole, you can expect some doubles and triples in there. Skins peel with exceptional ease and are light brown in color. Avoid "wet-feet" and choose a sunny spot to plant; consider a raised bed if you have heavy clay soil. Early to mid-season harvest.The common agreement is that Rocamboles store least long of all the groups. However, under ideal conditions they can store up to 8 months. Typically you should probably eat your Rocamboles first, within 4-5 months, to make sure and use them while freshest.

German Red -

Photo Credit: Growinggarlic.ca

Photo Credit: Filareefarm.com

Averages 6-8  large cloves that are fairly consistent in size. Turban garlic's are the earliest to harvest, often several weeks before other varieties.A great choice for early markets, these bulbs impress with their flattened shape and striking purple blotching. These strains are often the first to sprout in the spring. Turbans are weak-bolting hardnecks. Uzbek Turban Garlic originated in the Uzbekistan Republic. It was brought to North America by a R. Hannan from the former USSR Allium station.

Uzbek Turban - Not available for 2016

Averages 6-8 cloves that boast striking purple mottling and streaks. Late emergence and late harvest. Watch for the tell-tale sign of browning in the lower leaves. Storage: expect 5-6 months. Acquired in 1989 at a bazaar in Samarkand, Uzbekestan, by John Swenson. Thus, the name "Samarkand" is commonly used in parts of the world. Here in Canada it's more popularly known as Persian Star.

Persian Star -

Typically averages 7-11 cloves that are slender and well formed with striking purple streaks. Late emergence and late harvest. Watch for the tell-tale sign of browning in the lower leaves. Stores longer than Rocamboles but not so long as Porcelains and Artichokes. Expect 5-6 months. Originally from the Republic of Georgia, it was brought to the West from a small village named Shvelisi in 1985.

Chesnok Red -

Purple Stripe:

Hardnecks:

We currently grow 40 varieties of hardneck and softneck garlic.

We are currently updating our site with the new varieties we purchased last year. Let us know if your looking for a particular variety that is not on this page. (Contact Us)

 Garlic Cultivars

Purple Italian -

Photo Credit: Localharvest.org

Artichoke:

Yugoslovian -

Photo Credit: Rasacreekfarm.com

Averages 4 large cloves per bulb. Here's a Porcelain for western Canada. Susan Delafield's is well acclimated to wet conditions, at least better than most other Porcelains. Mid-season harvest. Porcelains are a good storing garlic. Expect 8-9 months. Came to us via Rasa Creek Farm, who received it from Boundary Garlic.

Majestic -

Photo Credit: Rasacreekfarm.com

Photo Credit: Rasacreekfarm.com

Photo Credit: Filareefarm.com

Averages 8-12 cloves that are slender and well formed with striking purple streaks. This Purple Stripe is a strong cultivar with potentially large bulbs, reaching three inches in diameter. Late emergence and late harvest. Watch for the tell-tale sign of browning in the lower leaves. Stores longer than Rocamboles but not so long as Porcelains and Artichokes. Expect 5-6 months. Some have experienced it storing past 7 months under the right conditions. Tibetan came to us from Jim at Rasa Creek Farm in Lumby BC. Who received it from the attentive and loving hands of Nicholas Peterson, who owns Nicola Valley Produce in Merritt, BC. He obtained Tibetan from Peter who lives in the hills in the southern region of the Okanagan Valley of BC.

Turban:

Weakly Bolting Hardnecks:

Averages 10-14 cloves of various sizes, from small to large, but not as large as a Porcelain. Skins are relatively tight. Strong spring emergence with good tolerance for wide range of soil conditions. Avoid overwatering, however. Harvest earlier than most softnecks. You'll want to be attentive to the timing, not allowing the bulb wrappers (leaves) deteriorate too far before harvest. Better to harvest too soon than too late if long storage is your aim. Will store right into spring. Cure it well in the fall and you'll have good hot garlic all winter long. This Italian has been grown in the Okanagan for decades and is well adapted to this region.

Susan Delafield - Not available for 2016

Photo Credit: Rasacreekfarm.com

Photo Credit: Rasacreekfarm.com

Porcelain:

Averages 7-8 cloves per bulb with slightly fewer doubles and triples than some Rocamboles. Avoid "wet-feet" and choose a sunny spot to plant; consider a raised bed if you have heavy clay soil. Early to mid-season harvest. The common agreement is that Rocamboles store least long of all the groups. However, under ideal conditions they can store up to 8 months. Typically you should probably eat your Rocamboles first, within 4-5 months, to make sure and use them while freshest. Known as the Giant of Ontario, this garlic reliably produces HUGE bulbs.

Rocambole:

Averages 5-7 large cloves that are fairly consistent in size.  We've been growing this cultivar since 2011 and have found it to be the most consistent performer in our fields. Tolerates a wide range of soil moisture and growing conditions. Mid-season harvest. Let those bulbs reach their maximum size by waiting until a good 50% of the leaves are brown. Good mid to long-term storing garlic. Expect 5-6 months if stored properly. This variety comes to us from my best friends parents, The Bonnemaison's, who had grown it out for almost 30 years on their farm in the South Okanagan.


Averages 6 large cloves that are fairly consistent in size. Mid-season harvest. Reliable and strong spring emergence with medium to broad leaves. Let the bulbs reach their maximum size by waiting until a good 50% of the leaves are brown. The wrappers on Marbled Purple Stripes are so thick and strong that you don't need as many to be intact at harvest. Good mid to long-term storing garlic. Expect 6-8 months if stored properly. Kostyn came to us from Rasa Creek Farm, who got it from Boundary Garlic; and they got it from Gary Swann of Port Alberni... whose uncle was the now infamous Kostyn.

Kostyn's Red -

Tibetan -

Marbled Purple Stripe:

Averages 5-7 cloves per bulb. This garlic is a good choice for those who are impatient for fresh garlic in the summer. Asian Tempest is an easy to grow garlic on most years which is harvested several weeks sooner than most hardneck garlic. It also is one of the first garlics to come up in the spring. Do not plant too early or too much top growth can be damaged in winter. Bulb size is slightly smaller than the Porcelains but the sweet taste is worth it! Early to harvest with a long storage capability.

Asian Tempest -

Photo Credit: Filareefarm.com

Asiatic:

Averages 4-5 large cloves per bulb. Very popular cultivar in the Okanagan and central BC, so it is well acclimated to this climate. Careful to keep it watered once the dry season hits. Scape removal is recommended to achieve good bulbing. Mid-season harvest. Porcelains are a good storing garlic. Expect 8-9 months. We received this cultivar from Rasa Creek Farm, who has been growing it since 2009, and came to them via Heino and Manuela Peters of Roots and Greens Farm.

Averages 4-5 large cloves per bulb. While typical in its structure and growth patterns, Majestic seems just a little more kingly, standing just a tad higher than its neighbors. Mid-season harvest. The wrappers are pretty sturdy on Porcelains and so the bulbs can stand waiting a bit longer before harvesting, maybe when 50 - 65% of the leaves are browning. Porcelains are a good storing garlic. Expect 7-8 months. Majestic has a fascinating history. Paul Pospisil (editor of The Garlic News and owner of Beaver Pond Estates in Ontario) is the "creator" of this cultivar and you can read the whole story here.

Puslinch -

Red Russian -